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Thread: First Generation Pokemon Guide

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    Default First Generation Pokemon Guide

    Differences Between Modern Metagames

    RBY was the first metagame, being that it has a variety of glitches and oddities that became an integral part of the metagame. There are also a variety of major changes that happened since RBY that one should be aware of to to play in the metgame. I will avoid going into the long list of poinless changes, like Bite changing type, and instead focus on the ones that actually matter.

    Type Differences

    First off, there exists no Dark and Steel types in this metagame, they don't exist, weren't invented yet. As a consequence, Magneton is a pure Electric-type, instead of the usual Steel / Electic type that you know for later generations.

    Psychic-types are not weak to Ghost attacks, instead they are immune to them. This is of little consequence though, as the only ghost type attacks are Lick and Night Shade, neither of which are worth using. Because Bug-types are so rare in RBY, Psychic-types effectively have no weaknesses.

    Outside of the useless constant damage Dragon Rage, there exists no Dragon-type attacks, meaning Dragonite gets no Dragon STAB moves. As mentioned about, Ghost to suffers from this problem.

    Ice is normally-effective on Fire-type defenders. So for example, Blizzard is super-effective on Charizard and Moltres.

    Poison-type type attacks are super-effective on Bug-types, Bug-type attacks are super-effective on Poison-types, this should only come into play when like Syther and Muk face each other, its a rather uncommon type problem.

    Mechanic Differences

    By far the biggest difference between latter generations is the lack of the Special Attack and Special Defense stats, instead, the stats are sort of smushed into one, creating an all encompassing Special stat. This single stat acts as both the Special Attack and Special Defense all in one for damage calculations.

    In RBY, this has the consequence of Pokemon with high Special stats, being very powerful, as that one stat effectively is 2 stats. In terms of modern mechanics, Alakazam for example in RBY not only has not only a base Special Attack of 135, but a base Special Defense of 135 to boot.

    The final consequence of this is that the moves Amnesia and Growth are much more damaging, effectively boosting 2 stats at once. Growth effectively acts like Calm Mind in later generations, and Amnesia, doubling the Special, acts like the moves Nasty Plot and Amnesia in swoop, effectively making a +4 boost.

    The physical and special split is defined purely by type in this generation, as with the next 2. Effectively all Pokemon moves of a specific type will either be special or physical, unlike later generations where it is defined per move. Take for example Normal-type moves, they are all physical, so both Body Slam and Hyper Beam do damage using the Attack stat, and it is decreased by the opponent's Defense stat, unlike later generations where Hyper Beam is a special move.

    The split is as follows:

    Physical attacks: Bug, Ghost, Ground, Normal, Fighting, Flying, Rock, Poison
    Special attacks: Dragon, Electric, Grass, Ice, Fire, Psychic, Water (Dragon has no use able moves)

    EVs, or Effort Values, in this generation function very differently. Without getting into the details, unlike later generations, the cap of EVs is limited to only to a stat, instead of 510 in total, so every stat can be maximized. This means that RBY Pokemon are a lot bulkier overall because all of their defensive stats are maximized, even though at the same the the offenses are maximized, so Alakazam can take a few more hits than usual and because its fully invested in its Special, Chansey is a hell of a lot more bulkier. Finally because both offenses can be maximized, a lot more Pokemon are free to be mixed attackers as well.

    Natures do not exist in this generation also and IVs are a maximum of 15 instead of 31, but those are of little consequence overall.

    Critical Hit Mechanics

    The critical hit mechanics of this generation of vastly different from that of later ones. In this generation, the odds of landing a critical hit vary depending on your Pokeon's base Speed, the higher the base Speed, the higher the critical hit ratio. So for example, Alakazam will land a critical hit about 23% of the time, while Lapras will only land a critical hit about 11% of the time.

    This has huge implications for the RBY metagame. Later generations have a much lower critical hit rate, about 6% for all pokemon, in comparison, only Slowbro and Snorlax have a similar critical hit rate, meaning critical hits a much more common in RBY. This makes RBY a much more luck driven metagame, you can lose to a much weaker foe if they get enough luck quite easily. Critical hits are to be expected, they are a crucial part of the RBY metgame, so be prepared to face them. In fact getting Critical Hits is often a viable strategy to check Pokemon, as the odds of not getting one are actually rare. This is in part why sweepers like Tauros are so deadly, as they can very easily change the game with a Critical Hit, which is bound to happen.

    Move Differences

    Trapping Moves: Wrap / Clamp / Bind have very different mechanics to those of later generations. Firstly, once a Pokemon is attacked by one of these moves and trapped, it can no longer move, once a move is selected it won't do anything. This will continue until wrap misses, or until you switch, something you can't do in later generations. This makes trapping moves particularly annoying, and dangerous in the end game, at best sweeping whole teams, and at worst doing a little passive damage as they attempt to PP stall them out.
    Hyper Beam: if a Pokemon is KOed, or finished off, by Hyper Beam, there is no recharge period. Due to it's high power and distribution, Hyper Beam is a very common finishing move in RBY, found on many Pokemon, to sweep in the end game once their opponents are low on health.
    Blizzard: has 90% accuracy unlike later generations, like Hyper Beam, due to it's high power and distribution, it is a very common coverage move which in addition also has a chance to Freeze.
    High Critical Hit Moves: Razor Leaf, Slash, Karate Chop, Crab Hammer are all moves with a high Critical Hit ratio. In RBY these moves will effectively land a Critical Hit every time they attack. Like regular Critical Hits the ratio is dependent on the user's base Speed, but the only Pokemon slow enough for this to happen to are Farfetch'd and Parasect, which don't matter.
    Reflect and Light Screen: the mechanics of these moves is a bit different than that of later generations, first off they only work on the Pokemon that sets them up and fall if switched, also they do not fall on a timer, so if set up they stay forever, until a switch. Because of this, they do not provide team support at all, but more of act as a pre wall set up to stall from. Since the move is often situational, it is used as filler in the case of Alakazam and Zapdos, as overal is tends to have little use because of the prevalence of critical hits in RBY.
    Substitute: Is overall, poorly coded and has a lot of glitches that aren't found in later generations. First off, Substitute will not block status moves at all, limiting its use compared to later generations. Substitute will fail to register the additional effects for mores: Hyper Beam will not force a recharge turn, Self Destruct and Explosion will not faint the user, and Mega Drain will not restore health. Finally, if Substitute is used at exactly 25% health, the user will faint. For all these reasons, Substitute is rather uncommon in RBY but can still be found on Pokemon with limited movepools, such as Rhydon.
    Leech Seed: Leech seed only drains 1/16th of the opponents health per turn, rather than 1/8th for later generations. Leech Seed uses the same counter for damage as Toxic, so if an opposing Pokemon is badly poisoned, it will be drained the same amount as Leech Seed. For example, if a Pokemon has been poisoned for 3 turns, after Leech Seed it will be drained 3/16th of it's health. Leech Seed is rather uncommon, as it only saps 1/16th of the opponents health, and any increasing effects with Toxic are rendered mute by Toxic's issues.
    Toxic: Toxic works like it does in other generations, increasing the damage per turn by 1/16th each turn. However, once the Badly Poisoned Pokemon switches, it becomes regular Poison, doing a mere 1/16 each turn, never increasing. For this reason, Toxic is a very poor move in RBY, used only on Pokemon with equally poor movepools. The only Pokemon which is known to use it from time to time is Zapdos, so it can do something to an incoming Rhydon or Golem.

    Odds and Ends

    The most important random quirk is how Freezing works in this generation, for all intents and purposes, if a Pokemon is Frozen, it doesn't thaw, effectively killing it. In contrast later generations have a 20% chance of un-freezing and thawing with the use of Fire-type moves, none of that happens in RBY. The only way a Pokemon can thaw is if a Fire-type attack is used on a Frozen Pokemon. For this reason, Fire-type Pokemon and moves are very uncommon in RBY, as they don't want to risk the chance of un-freezing an opposing Pokemon.

    Sleep is has some interesting changes compared to other generations. First off a sleeping Pokemon can not move the turn it awakes, instead giving the message "X Pokemon has awoken." Sleep also lasts anywhere from 1-7 turns, which is much longer than other generations. This makes Sleep much more deadly than later generations, as the time its sleeping can be much longer and is unable to move after it wakes up. However, in generation 5, the sleep counter resets if the Pokemon is switched, ironically making Sleep more deadly there than in RBY.

    Because of coding errors, a move will always be slightly less accurate than what shown, to be precise, it is 1/256th less accurate. For example a 100% accurate move actually has 255/256 accuracy, or it is 99.61% accurate. In game this can have the odd consequence of games instantly turning on their head from a freak miss, so never toss in the towel for a game, because for all you know you might get lucky and they miss.

    There are no items in this generation, this means no Life Orb, Choice Band, or Choice Scarf to help your offenses, but no Leftovers to passively heal. Overall this balances out the metagame, with no outright powerhouses ripping apart teams, and outside of Chansey, few walls that can endlessly wall out foes.

    Finally there are no abilities in this generation, for most Pokemon, which were left in the dust bin of future generations the loss is unnoticeable. The biggest change to a Pokemon is arguably Gengar, which lacking levitate is now weak to Earthquake. Chansey and Starmie without Natural Cure are now vulnerable to status, most importantly Freeze and Paralysis. Dragonite lacks multiscale, taking full damage from super-effective moves at full health. Snorlax is not resistant to Fire and Ice type moves without Thick Fat.

    Banned Pokemon and Rules


    Mew and Mewtwo are almost universally banned in the first generation with little exceptions. Unlike other legendary of this generation, they actually pose a real and significant threat of sweeping whole teams. Mewtwo gets access to Amnesia tied with blistering speed and special, after just 2 boosts it reaches the special cap. Its wide movepool leaves nothing to be desired for coverage. Mew has even more coverage, but more importantly it has fastest Swords Dance in the game with recovery. With little help, both of these pokemon can sweep whole teams.

    The rules for this generation are similar to others, and as follows: Species Clause, Sleep Clause, Evasion Clause, OHKO Clause.

    The only roughly special rule for this generation is the Freeze Clause. The Freeze Clause says it is illegal to freeze more than one Pokemon of the opponent. The reason for this is that thawing in the first generation is almost impossible, as passively thawing is not a mechanic of this generation. Because of this, it is common for Blizzard and Ice Beam spamming to occur, rolling the dice for a freeze which is almost instant death. If you freeze more than one Pokemon, you lose from breaking the clause.

    There are some variations on the rules though. The biggest variation is if trapping moves: Wrap, Bind, and Clamp, are banned. This is for 2 reasons: they are a pain to deal with and overall just annoying, and for the original RBY metagame over a decade ago, they did not work for coding reasons, so the metagame of old was without them. I will be covering the trapping and non-trapping metagame in this guide. The other major variation is going by the Pokemon Stadium mechanics, which fix a lot of this generations bugs which are taken for norm, such as Hyper Beam not recharging if the Pokemon is KOed, thawing naturally, high-critical hit moves always criting, and Focus Energy actually working.

    General Playstyle Differences

    Because of these glitches and different mechanics, the RBY metagame is played a bit differently from later ones.

    The first big actual play difference is the lack of set-up sweepers, there is no Dragon Dance, Quiver Dance, Curse, Nasty Plot, or Belly Drum. The only offensive boosting moves are Swords Dance, Growth, and Amnesia, all in relatively poor distribution on otherwise mediocre Pokemon. With no boosting Pokemon, the game becomes much more set up for the end game sweep only after all Pokemon are worn down. Instead of focusing on getting rid of X Pokemon to sweep, RBY is more about doing chip damage to the opponent so eventually one can sweep. Every bit of damage counts in a game with no leftovers and recovery on only a few odd Pokemon. The more damage you do, the better in the end game you are.

    Paralysis is king in RBY. Almost almost everything has a paralysis move in RBY, from Body Slam to Thunder Wave. The main exceptions are Stun Spore-less Exeggutor, non-Body Slam Persian, some versions of Chansey, and Cloyster. Paralysis is useful for a variety of reasons, first off it cripples opposing attackers such as Tauros, which are pretty much dead after being paralyzed as they can not attack effectively. In return, a paralyzed opposing team means that your Pokemon can easily go first and attack, and probably sweep. A lot of the RBY centers around speed for the end game, either to kill that last Pokemon by virtue of being faster than it, or to KO and sweep a team with a powerful Hyper Beam from Tauros. Finally, as mentioned RBY Pokemon are pretty bulky overall, leading to after mentioned chip damage games. With more attacking turns to KO, the 25% paralysis chance often comes in handy to gain the upper hand in a fight.

    If paralysis is King, Freezes are the Queen in RBY. As mentioned earlier, unfreezing a Pokemon in RBY is exceedingly difficult, effectively making a Pokemon dead if frozen by chance instantly, made worse that in RBY Blizzard is an extremely common coverage move on most Pokemon, giving a Freeze ample chances to set in on the average battle. More importantly though, Freeze allows special attackers to kill Chansey, which could otherwise wall them endlessly. Many games often come down to 'freeze the Chansey's with both sides spamming Ice moves to chance Freeze it. Because of this, Chansey prefers to be paralyzed, so that it can never be frozen, giving Chansey the upper hand in battles, games can come down to paralyzing the faster opponent, or risk Paralyzing Chansey, losing the chance to Freeze the bastard.

    And finally, there is sleep. Unlike later generations, a dedicated Sleeper on a team is basically a requirement, some teams even have two or more. The reason being that sleep is particularly dangerous in this generation, as it can potentially last 7 turns and alters the opponent the it is waking up the turn before it can move. A sleeping Pokemon is almost a dead Pokemon in RBY because of the fast pace of the average game. However, it is not as threatening as Paralysis or Freeze for a variety of reasons, the biggest being that most teams have a dedicated sleep absober already: there own Sleeper. Outside of sleeping the opponent, a Sleeper rarely has much else to contribute to the team outside of some pivoting, like Gengar for example which pretty much just takes Normal attacks. However, do not underestimate sleep, if one does not play the sleep game yourself, you are liable for having a critical Pokemon crippled for the game.

    Threatlist

    Common Pokemon:

    Offensive Threats

    Tauros

    -Body Slam
    -Hyper Beam
    -Blizzard
    -Earthquake

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Fire Blast
    -Substitute
    -Thunder
    -Thunderbolt

    Tauros is the defining Pokemon of this generation, earning a place on nearly every team. Its power, speed, and almost perfect movepool allow it to beat almost every pokemon one on one and easily sweep teams in the end game. Tauros's high critical hit rate allows you to luck your way through games at the very least. It is said that "if there is a Tauros, there is a way." If you are not using Tauros already, put it on your team, there is almost no downside to running Tauros, it just wins games.

    Body Slam is Tauros's main tool, taking large chunks of HP off even the most defensive of Pokemon and paralyzing foes. Hyper Beam is the cleaning move, used to kill off weakened pokemon in one sweeping attack. Hyper Beam isn't limited to cleaning though, it can be used as a deadly outright KOing move, as with a critical it gets to ludicrous power, and that happens over 20% of the time. Blizzard and Earthquake finish off the coverage, hitting the rock types: Rhydon and Golem, and Gengar with super effective power. Blizzard is more effective on Golem and Rhydon though, hitting them on their weaker special side, Earthquake for Gengar.

    Checks and Counters

    Because of Tauros's power and high critical hit chance, few things can switch in safely. Overall the best way to deal with Tauros is to not let it get a safe switch in. Have all the members of your team be able to take on Tauros in some way, or at the very least be able to cripple it. If once has to switch into Tauros, only the most defensive pokemon are suggested: Snorlax, Cloyster, Exeggutor, and Slowbro all can take a few hits and hit it hard in return. Rhydon and Golem can both take one Blizzard, allowing them one turn to check. Alakazam, Starmie, and Persian can all out speed and hit it hard in return, the two former can also cripple with thunder wave. If all else fails, one's own Tauros can be used in a deadly duel for the fate of the battle.

    Alakazam

    -Psychic
    -Thunder Wave
    -Recover
    -Seismic Toss / Reflect

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Substitute
    -Kinesis

    Alakazam has the highest Special in the metagame, which even gives Chansey a second thought. It also has a blistering speed, only outspeed by the uncommon Jolteon, Electrode, and Aerodactyl, effectively making it the fastest pokemon in the metagame, making it a monster special sweeper which gets plenty of critical hits. Alakazam suffers from 2 critical problems though: it is horrendously frail, even with it's monstrous special, its pitiful 55 base HP makes it a rather poor special sponge, while its defenses on the physical side are paper thin with a base 45 Defense. Finally, it has a rather poor special movepool, outside of Psychic is literally has no other special move to be used by it's monster Special. Still, in spite of these problems, Alakazam can be a fearsome mono-attacker which every team should be prepared for.

    Psychic is Alakazam's only weapon of attack, but it certainly isn't anything to laugh at, even pokemon which resist it take large chunks form it. Combined with Alakazam's high critical hit ratio and psychic's 30% chance of a special defense drop, not even Chansey herself can fully take the brunt of Alakazam's attacks. Thunder Wave allows Alakazam to cripple other attackers, this is particularly useful against Tauros who can beat out Alakazam before it can kill it with Psychic. Recover allows to be restore health and be a sort of special sponge, this can be useful against the likes of Chansey, out stalling it. The final slot is under much contention, Reflect makes it much harder for Tauros and Snorlax to beat Alakazam, allowing it to last longer tied with Recover, although in practice critical hits and paralysis usually kill it off anyway, but not before doing some serious damage. Seismic Toss on the other hand allows consistent 100 damage to Pokemon which resist Psychic, such as Exeggutor and Starmie, and Seismic Toss's PP allows it to beat Chansey.

    Checks and Counters

    Combined with a high Special and recovery, Alakazam can be quite a pickle to deal with. The best switch ins are only the most specially defensive Pokemon: Chansey, Starmie, Exeggutor, Zapdos, Slowbro and Snorlax. In Chansey, Starmie, and Exeggutor's case, it is best to attempt to cripple Alakazam instead of killing it, and have it be killed in the late game, as because of Recover, killing Alakazam with special attackers can be quite the pain to KO. Snorlax is one of the few Pokemon which can switch in and really threaten to KO, and even then it can be halted by Reflect, Zapdos fairs about as well with Drill Peck. Amnesia Snorlax and Slowbro can truly counter it thanks to their special boosts. Rhydon and Golem can eat one Psychic and retaliate with Earthquake.

    Starmie

    -Blizzard
    -Thunderbolt
    -Thunder Wave
    -Recover

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Hydro Pump
    -Surf

    Alakazam is almost in the same vein as Alakazam, a fast special sweeper, but Starmie almost trades Alazakam's massive power, for a much wider movepool. Because of this, Starmie is paradoxically much easier to deal with for some Pokemon such as Chansey, but because of its wide movepool, it can now hit much more Pokemon harder such as Slowbro much harder with Thunderbolt. Starmie's Water-typing gives it some unique resistances, such as a resistance to Ice, but then again Starmie is weak to water. There are many pros and cons of Starmie compared to Alakazam one much consider when choosing them for a team.

    The standard tool of Starmie is Blizzard, a good strong coverage move, even if it does lose out on STAB. Blizzard also has the advantage of freezing foes at random, which is always a good thing. Thunderbolt is the secondary coverage move, allowing Starmie to hit pokemon the resist Blizzard: opposing Water-types. With that, Starmie obtains virtually perfect coverage in the classic Bolt-Beam combo. Thunder Wave can cripple foes such as Alakazam and Tauros, for a late game sweep by something else. One should be careful of how to use this tool, as Chansey is more than eager to be paralyzed to avoid being frozen. Recover allows Starmie to last in the battle for a bit longer, which can be particularlly useful against Jynx, Alakazam, and Chansey.

    Checks and Counters

    As mentioned, Chansey is one of the best counters out there, taking little damage from all of Starmie's moves, only fearing a Blizzard freeze. Alakazam with Seismic Toss can beat Starmie out, although Alakazam will get paralyzed in the process. Snorlax can easily punish Starmie with Body Slam, and Amnesia Snorlax completely walls it. Exeggutor and Zapdos can both eat a few Blizzards thanks to their high special, and punish with Thunderbolt and Sleep Powder and then Mega Drain. Golem and Rhydon can always take a hit and kill off a weakened Starmie with Earthquake. Persian can gamble a speed tie to kill it, but only Jolteon out speeds to check Starmie.

    Gengar

    -Hypnosis
    -Thunderbolt
    -Explosion
    -Mega Drain

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Dream Eater
    -Psychic
    -Night Shade

    Gengar isn't exactly a sweeper, mainly because it lacks any good STAB moves to use. However, Gengar is an excellent "tool" so to speak. Hypnosis is is what makes it stand out, making it the fastest sleeper in the metagame, which in turn makes it and excellent lead. Being a ghost type, Gengar possesses many resistances, including an immunity to the ever common Hyper Beam, making it a solid pivot to a variety of Pokemon. Gengars large special also makes it an ok special sponge. Gengar lacks a good offensive movepool though to team teams in the standard RBY way, by beating them over the head, so using it required quite a bit of skill, but if you can use it correctly, it certainly is a good pokemon. Finally, Gengar is immune to Wrap and Bind, making it a great counter to Dragonite in the Wrap metagame.

    Hypnosis is the crux of Gengar, allow it to shut down pokemon, and at the same time making it an effective lead. Thunderbolt is Gengars primary attacking move, with decent coverage backed by a solid Special, it still does a decent chunk of damage. Explosion is another one of Gengar's toys, allowing it to kill off special walls which might otherwise counter it, a bit suicidally of course. One should note though that Gengar's attack is pitiful, so if Explosion is used, make sure it kills them, otherwise they can heal up right after you explode. Finally Mega Drain is a toss on move, allowing Gengar to beat weakened Rhydons and Golems, which would otherwise counter it.

    Checks and Counters

    Countering Gengar can be a bit of a pickle, as nothing is really safe from its full moveset, luckily, nothing, outside of water types, is that weak to it, so it can be beaten one on one often. Make sure that Gengar has put something to sleep already though. The best counter for Gengar is Exeggutor, which resists all its moves and takes Explosion fine, Exeggutor can even be a pain for Gengar to handle if asleep. Standard Snorlax with Earthquake beats Gengar, but otherwise Gengar wall its, be careful of Explosion to, Amnesia Snorlax fairs much better though. Zapdos makes a solid switch in to Gengar aswell, threatening it with STAB Drill Peck. Tauros, Chansey, and Alakzam can all force Gengar to explode, as Thunderbolt and Mega drain to pitiful damage to them. Rhydon and Golem can stomach one Mega Drain at full health and KO with STAB super effective Earthquake.

    Zapdos

    -Thunderbolt
    -Drill Peck
    -Thunder Wave
    -Rest / Reflect / Toxic

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Mimic
    -Light Screen
    -Thunder

    Zapdos is an almost forgotten threat in this evolved metagame, the reason being that it is completely counted by the ever present Golem and Rhydon. But if you attempt to run a team without them, or lose them prematurely in a battle, prepare to feel the wrath of the thunder God. Zapdos has a respectable speed and special, allowing it to out speed most Pokemon and punish them with STAB Thunderbolt. More importantly though, Zapdos is has respectable defenses, allowing it to take most hits pretty well. Zapdos is overall a very well rounded Pokemon, at times this can mean it has problems distinguishing itself, but Zapdos works well as a glue for a team, fixing up weaknesses to Pokemon such as Slowbro, Exeggutor, and checking Cloyster, Lapras. Zapdos is also one of the few pokemon which can consistantly beat out opposing Chanseys with Drill Peck.

    Thunderbolt is Zapdos's main attacking option, hitting everything with it's monstrous special STAB. Drill Peck is sort of the coverage move, hitting Exeggutor with super effective damage, while hitting Chansey and Alakazam on their weaker physical side. Thunder Wave can be used to cripple incoming threats, and while there isn't much, outside of Golem and Rhydon of course, that isn't hit hard by Drill Peck or Thunderbolt, Thunderwave can be used to cripple when you know Zapdos won't be able to kill the threat, and in the long run paralysis would be better. The last slot is completely open for whatever, rest can be used to heal, Reflect can annoy physical threats making Zapdos a pain to take out, and Toxic can do a little bit of damage to Golem and Rhydon every time they come in.

    Checks and Counters

    Golem and Rhydon are the best counters, Drill Peck only does about 10% for each switch in. Should you lose them, Snorlax can switch in pretty reliably and punish with Body Slam. Chansey, while not ideal, and whittle Zapdos down with Ice Beam, and threaten a freeze. Exeggutor can stomach one Drill Peck and put it to sleep or Explode. Tauros, Persian, Starmie, and Alakazam can all check a weakened Zapdos.

    Persian

    -Slash
    -Bubblebeam
    -Hyper Beam
    -Screech / Body Slam

    Persian is in a very similar vein as Tauros, a fast normal type with strong STAB moves with a fair movepool. Persain distinguishes itself in 2 ways, Persian is faster, having the same speed as Starmie, and in turn it has a higher critical hit rate. Persian also has the precious move Slash, which for all intents and purposes, lands a critical hit every time, bumping it up to 140 power. Persian though, has its failings, first off it's attack is lower, making its Slash only a little stronger than Tauros's Body Slam. Persian is also much frailer, making it much more easily taken out. Finally, Persian's coverage misses out of Gengar, which completely counters it. Instead of trying to compete with Tauros, Persian usually acts as a secondary late game sweeper, complimenting Tauros.

    Slash is Persian's main move, ripping chunks of HP off with each attack. Bubblebeam allows Persian to kill off a weakened Rhydon or Golem. Hyper Beam is less of a finishing move, and more of an attempt to KO with a critical hit, as Hyper Beam only has 10 more power than Slash. The last move slot is completely filler, Screech can be used to scare out opponents by knowing they will be hit next with a Hyper Beam at double power, Body Slam can attempt to paralyze or again land a critical without the risk of needing to recharge.

    Checks and Counters

    Persian is dealt with in the same manner as Tauros, don't give it any free Pokemon for it to switch into and attack or cripple it on sight, in Persians case it might more effective to attack outright, as it is frailer. Also, since Persian is a little weaker overall, one can more safely switch in tanks like Cloyster, Slowbro, and Exeggutor. Alakazam is one of the few Pokemon which can outspeed Persian and check it.

    Jynx

    -Lovely Kiss
    -Blizzard
    -Psychic
    -Mimic

    Uncommon moves:
    -Ice Beam
    -Seismic Toss

    Jynx looks rather unimpressive on paper, none of its states break 100, its horrendously frail and it's speed is rather middling. Jynx has all the tools it needs though: Lovely Kiss and Blizzard. Lovely Kiss is one of the more accurate Sleep moves, and with a solid speed, Jynx makes for a good lead with it. Blizzard is already a great coverage move, but Jynx gets STAB with it, powering it up to 180 power, something little can take well. The chance of a freeze that can come from Blizzard is never bad either. Still, though, Jynx's middling speed and low defenses make it easy to check, it takes a little skill and luck to pull off Jynx to its fullest.

    As stated Jynx's main tools are STAB Blizzard and Lovely Kiss, the rest of the move set is overall filler. Psychic is a secondary stab move, hitting Lapras and Cloyster will full damage, and Gengar with super-effective damage, usually tough it is used as a finishing move, in order to not lose precious Blizzard PP. Mimic can be useful against Starmie, as Thunder Wave, Thunderbolt, and Recover are all moves Jynx would love to have to use against it.

    Checks and Counters

    When facing Jynx, it is best to bait it to use Lovely Kiss on a weakened Pokemon, or to sleep fodder it, so that its one Pokemon put to sleep is wasted. Slowbro is the best counter, who can set up Amnesia on it. Starmie and Chansey are some of the best switch-in's to Jynx, only fearing Sleep and a Freeze, both can retaliate with Thunder Wave and Thunderbolt. Lapras resists Blizzard and is immune to Freezing, forcing Jynx to use to much weaker Psychic, Lapras in return can attack with Body Slam on it weak physical side. Snorlax is a fair counter, although it doesn't quite like stomaching a Blizzard, but it can sure scare it out with STAB Body Slam, Amnesia Snorlax is a complete counter. Alakazam can whittle it down with seismic toss. Persian, Tauros, and Zapdos all out speed to check Jynx.

    Dragonite

    -Blizzard
    -Body Slam
    -Hyper Beam
    -Thunderbolt / Surf / Agility

    Dragonite is rather pathetic without Wrap, with middling speed, and no stab moves. The best you can get out of Dragonite is a sort of mixed attacker because of it's rather wide movepool. It can be a bit of an annoyance, as nothing can really switch into it safely, and you might be able to KO an important pokemon, with the right prediction, but outside of that it is largely worthless. Worst of all it is almost completely open to Tauros and lother Blizzard Pokemon, which are licking their lips to Blizzard it.

    Blizzard is it's main attacking option, one of the strongest moves it has. Body Slam and Hyper Beam can be used to attack physically with its admittedly monstrous Attack, the later can be used as a finishing move. The last slot suffers from a bit of 4 slot move syndrome Thunderbolt can damage Slowbro and Cloyster, while surf grantees KOs on Golem and Rhydon which can otherwise seriously damage with Rock Slide, Agility might allow it to get a late can sweep with the speed jump... maybe.

    Checks and Counters:

    Cloyster, Lapras, and Slowbro can come in without issue on all of Dragonite's moves outside of Thunderbolt, and even then it just loses further coverage to other Pokemon. Without a well timed Body Slam paralysis or Blizzard freeze, Starmie, Jynx, and Tauros can all come in and threaten with a powerful Blizzard. Gengar is an almost complete counter, taking Blizzard fine and retaliating with Thunderbolt. Snorlax can take all of Dragonite's moves easily and threaten with Blizzard or Body Slam, Chansey can also take a hit and blast it with Ice Beam or cripple with Thunder Wave.

    Tanks and Walls

    Golem / Rhydon
    /
    -Body Slam
    -Earthquake
    -Explosion / Substitute
    -Rock Slide

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Hyper Beam

    For all intents and purposes, Rhydon and Golem are the same Pokemon. The major toss up between the Rhydon's much higher Attack stat, and Golem's ability to use Explosion. It really depends on how important you think Explosion would be, if you feel that you would be better if your Rhydon could just explode on threats, consider Golem, and if you rarely use Explosion, switch to Rhydon. Outside of that, the differences are minor. Rhydon, because of its higher HP, is slightly bulkier on both sides, but the difference in bulk is negligible. Golem is faster, but only by 5 base speed points, so effectively it only out speeds opposing Rhydons in comparison.

    Rhydon and Golem are the proto-typical niche Pokemon, using all their resistances to their fullest ability here. Their rock typing give them a resistance to the ever common Hyper Beam, if they switch into it they gain one free attack at the enemy recharges on it. Immunity to electic attacks allows they to pivot into thunderbolt, but more importantly completely counter Zapdos. High defenses and Attack allow both to be solid tanks in any situation, and even be sweeping Pokemon in the end game, once paralysis is spread. However, they are still very slow and a bit weak on the Special side, so at times they can be sitting ducks, waiting for a Blizzard to hit them.

    The movepool is pretty standard, Earthquake is solid STAB, while Body Slam is a good coverage move that also spreads paralysis to incoming attackers. As stated earlier, the main choice here is Explosion, to run Rhydon or Golem. On Golem Explosion is the key move, doing massive damage on threats, a bit suicidal. Rhydon then runs Substitute, which can be effective, as Rhydon can force switches, you then set up a barrier from which to attack behind. Rock Slide is the standard STAB coverage move, hitting Zapdos and incoming Cloyster and Lapras harder. However, at times it can be a bit redundant, so people may run Hyper Beam, or even Substitute in Golem's case, over it.

    Checks and Counters

    Exeggutor can literally take every move they can throw at it fine, and threaten to put it to sleep, even behind a Substitute, or just damge with Psychic or Mega Drain. With a little prior damage, Snorlax can KO them with Surf, although it won't enjoy eating Earthquakes. Slowbro can switch in on all of Rhydon's attacks, and threaten an Amensia sweep, healing all damage with Rest, however Golem is more than happy to just Explode on Slowbro. Jynx, Lapras, Cloyster, and Hypro Pump or Surf Starmie can all outspeed and 1HKO. A lot of Pokemon can finish off them after a little prior damage, such as Mega Drain Gengar, Blizzard Tauros, and Bubblebeam Persian. Reflect Alakazam can systematically bring Rhydon down while using Recover. Even Chansey can finish them off with Ice Beam at around 60% health.

    Chansey

    -Softboiled
    -Ice Beam
    -Thunderbolt
    -Thunder Wave / Counter

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Reflect
    -Seismic Toss
    -Sing

    Chansey is the epitome of a special sponge with massive HP and Special, without some luck, special attackers can often can't take down the pink blob. This comes as a cost though, Chansey is pretty physically frail, only slightly more bulky than the likes of Alakazam, because of it's horrendous Defense. Luckily, unlike later generations, Chansey actually packs quite the punch to it, thanks to having Special be one stat, allowing it to be a decent attacker. A wide movepool gives it plenty of options to play with and cripple enemies. Still, Chansey's low speed and Defense to make it a target, so one has to play with it carefully.

    Softboiled is a given, allowing Chansey to heal with ease. Ice Beam and Thunderbolt are the standard coverage moves, hitting everything neutrally and giving the standard Bolt-Beam coverage. Ice Beam is further useful for attempting to Freeze threats, such as opposing Chanseys. Thunder Wave and Counter are moves which allow Chansey to cripple or kill threats. Thunder Wave cripples opposing fast pokemon such as Tauros and Alakazam, which counter can outright kill opposing physical threats such as Tauros and Snorlax, if it uses a normal move. The choice between these either allows Chansey to be a surprise killer, or a Pokemon to spread paralysis, the choice is yours. Some opt to ditch Thunderbolt instead, but that leaves Chansey horrendously open to Starmie and other water types which it should be walling.

    Checks and Counters

    The best counter of Chansey, is your own Chansey, forcing a Freeze war by spamming Ice Beam, hoping for a freeze, if your Chansey is paralyzed, you already won. Snorlax makes a fair counter to Chansey, taking little from all its moves and caring little about paralysis, one must be careful, as Counter Chansey though can 1HKO Snorlax. For Chansey without Thunderbolt, Starmie can attempt to freeze with Blizzard. Seismic Toss Alakazam has more PP than Chansey, eventually forcing it to struggle, although Alakazam will be paralyzed in the process. Alakazam can also spam Psychic for defense drops to kill it. Zapdos has a solid chance as killing off Chansey with STAB Drill Peck on it's physical stab. Golem and Rhydon can switch in, bar Ice Beam, and threaten with Earthquake, or even Explosion, Exeggutor can also KO with Explosion. Finally, Tauros and Persian can finish a weakened Chansey off with Hyper Beam.

    Exeggutor

    -Sleep Powder
    -Psychic
    -Explosion
    -Mega Drain / Stun Spore

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Double Edge
    -Leech Seed
    -Toxic

    Exeggutor, like Gengar is more of a tool than a sweeper, or in this case a wall. Sleep Powder makes Exeggutor an excellent lead, combating the ever common Gengar lead fine, while having enough bulk to take a hit and put something to sleep, outside of STAB Blizzard from Jynx, Cloyster, and Lapras. Exeggutor's Grass / Psychic typing gives it many unique resistances, allowing it to check Psychic-types like Alakazam and counter completely Rhydon ad Golem. Finally, Exeggutor's overall bulk allows it to check many things in general, including the ever present Tauros, Exxegutor has an even high special, making it a great sponge. Exeggutor has very little problems in RBY outside of weakness to Blizzard, making it a fine choice for most teams.

    Sleep Powder is Exeggutor's crux, allowing it to cripple opposing Pokemon. Psychic is the STAB move of choice, hitting nearly everything hard because of Exeggutor's high Special, the 30% chance of a special drop never hurts either. Explosion allows Exeggutor to get rid of possible threats by sacrificing itself, it is particularly useful against opposing Chansey and Snorlax. The last slot is a bit of a toss up, Mega Drain is great against Rhydon and Golem to 1HKO them and gain health in the process or heal up passively on weakened threats, while Stun Spore makes a great double powder set, crippling faster opposing Pokemon after Sleep Powder has been used.

    Checks and Counters

    Because of the risk of Explosion and Sleep Powder, Exeggutor can be a bit of a pickle to counter, luckily, once it uses then, you no longer have to deal with it. The best bet to deal with Exeggutor is to let something fall asleep, and then bait it into using Explosion, and switch to a normal resist, once its health has fallen. Zapdos is one of the best counters, threatening it with Drill Peck. Snorlax can get Exeggutor down to low health, and if it scores a paralysis, can even finish off with Hyper Beam. Chansey will almost always get Exeggutor to explode. Lapras, Cloyster, and Jynx can all outspeed and 1HKO with STAB super-effective Blizzard, Tauros and Persian can kill off a weakened Exeggutor. Finally, your own Exeggutor make a fine switch in, as they can't though each other bar Explosion.

    Snorlax


    Snorlax is one of the best tanks in RBY, it can take almost every hit and dish them right back thanks to its high defenses and Attack. Snorlax possesses one of the highest usable attacks in the game backed by solid STAB moves, to make things even better, Snorlax has a very wide movepool, with access to a plethora of all kinds of moves. For RBY, Snorlax is an amazing Pokemon, serving as the glue for most teams, but it is often hindered by its abysmal Speed, which makes it so Snorlax is always a target for critical hits. Still, all in all Snorlax is a solid Pokemon that can find a place for most teams that need a strong tank to fix up their problems.

    Snorlax is one of the few pokemon in the first generation to have 2 distinct sets, Amnesia is uncommon.

    Standard ("Fishlax")
    -Body Slam
    -Surf
    -Self Destruct
    -Hyper Beam / Earthquake

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Blizzard

    The common Snorlax set, and for a good reason, its by far more effective. Body Slam is the key move, being a only STAB move, spreading paralysis. Sure though gives the set it's common nickname: Fishlax. Surf allows Snorlax to KO Golem and Rhydon with a little prior damage, Pokemon which would otherwise wall it. Self Destruct allows Snorlax to have a final "boom" before it goes, doing massive STAB damage to whatever it hits, getting rid of threats in one swoop. The last slot is a bit of a toss up, Hyper Beam is a great finishing move against a variety of threats from Exeggutor to Chansey, however, without Earthquake Snorlax is complete bait for Gengar, so Earthquake is worth considering on Snorlax for that reason alone.

    Amnesia
    -Amnesia
    -Blizzard
    -Body Slam / Thunderbolt
    -Self Destruct / Rest

    Amnesia Snorlax has the same problem as Slowbro, critical hits foil the best laid plans of sweeping. However, Snorlax can be played from a slightly different angle, hiding its Amnesia until its to late or surprising the foe with it, which makes it slightly more effective with it. Blizzard is the move of choice to use for Blizzard, as its a strong move with solid coverage. Body Slam allows Snorlax to play the part of Fishlax and still do solid damage and spread paralysis, or Thunderbolt can be used ti finish off the perfect Bold-Beam coverage. Finally, in the last slot you can either choose to Self Destruct, and completely bomb the pokemon they send to stop you, or Rest if you actually think Snorlax might have a chance at an Amnesia sweep.

    Checks and Counters

    Snorlax is an absolute monster, so if you can kill Snorlax by losing only one Pokemon, count yourself lucky. The only Pokemon which can stand the full force of Snolax is Cloyster, and even it will take a serious beating. One of the best Snorlax checks is one's own Snorlax to equal the destruction on both sides, at the very least, you can Self Destruct on the opposing Snorlax and effectively kill it. Exeggutor can rip large chunks of health away and finish off with Explosion. Rhydon and Golem and switch in on a predicted Normal-type attack, and hit once with Earthquake, stomaching a Surf at full health, and in Golem's case, Exploding to kill. Gengar can beat out any non-Earthquake or Amnesia Snorlax, and at the very least can explode on it. If Counter Chansey can fool Snorlax into attacking it, the result is an instant 1HKO. Reflect Alakazam has a decent shot at taking Snorlax down, although a critical hit or paralysis can ruin those plans. A weakened Snorlax can be checked by Tauros and Persian.

    Slowbro

    -Amnesia
    -Surf
    -Rest
    -Thunder Wave

    Slowbro stands out as one of the most defensive Pokemon in the metagame, and one of the better amnesia abusers. With just a few amnesia boosts, Slowbro can KO just about anything, while at the same time being a solid wall on the physical side, and having resistances to Ice and Psychic types, allowing it to wall Alakazam and Jynx, all in all making it a pain to take out. However, Slowbro faces a serious problem, critical hits, gen 1 is full of critical hits, making it almost impossible for Slowbro to set up. For this reason, Slowbro is one of the more uncommon OU pokemon among serious players, as it more often than not, fails to accomplish anything. But if Slowbro does happen to get lucky, it can easily sweep entire teams.

    Amnesia is of course the crux of the set, doubling its special with each iteration, making it a monster boosting sweeper. Surf is the boosted move of choice, being a strong STAB move that hits many Pokemon with neutral damage, other moves can be replaced here though if you choose like Ice Beam, or Thunderbolt, STAB Surf if the superior and common choice though. Rest allows Slowbro to heal, and barring a crit, this can be used to bring Slowbro up to more health, so that it can perform it's sweep. Finally, Thunder Wave allows Slowbro to cripple foes, Slowbro can't always rist attempting to Amnesia up against foes like Tauros, and parahax is always useful in boosting up anyway.

    Checks and Counters

    One of the more reliable counters is Zapdos, while on paper Zapdos might look to fall to the power of Amnesia boosts, one critical hit from STAB Thunderbolt, and Slowbro is a goner. Snorlax can take a few boosted hits and retaliate with Body Slam and finish off with Hyper Beam, one critical hit and Slowbro can be KOed, worst case scenario, Snorlax can use Self Destruct to take it down with it. Chansey, Gengar, and Starmie can combat it with Thunderbolt, but they will need more than one critical hit to beat it completely. Golem and Exeggutor can explode on it if need be as well. Finally, Rhydon, Tauros, and Persian can all outspeed and kill off a weakened Slowbro.

    Lapras

    -Confuse Ray
    -Blizzard
    -Body Slam
    -Rest / Thunderbolt

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Sing

    Lapras is a bit of a strangely played pokemon. On paper, it doesn't look that impressive, maybe an ok tank, but that's it. In battle though, Lapras abuses Confuse Ray, and paralysis, among other annoying moves, lucking itself to wins, the good ol'fashion RBY way. Lapras is particularly annoying to other defensive cores, out speeding them and threatening them with a variety of moves. In a way, Lapras is more of a wall breaker than a tank, but it can still use those same techniques on faster Pokemon, thanks to its high defenses, making it an effective annoyance to all.

    Confuse Ray is the crux of Lapras's set, allowing it to make the opponent hit it self 50% of the time, giving Lapras plenty of time to use its other moves. Blizzard is Lapras's main STAB move, doing massive damage to most Pokemon and possibly even freezing the opponent. Body Slam annoys Lapras to not only spread around paralysis, but damage Pokemon such as Starmie and Alakazam on their weaker physical side, allowing Lapras to be a sort of mixed sweeper. Finally, Rest allows Lapras to heal, which can be effective since you will be hitting yourself half the time, while Thunderbolt does more damage to opposing Cloyster, Lapras, and Starmie.

    Checks and Counters

    Chansey is one of the safest counters for Lapras, taking little from hitting itself and Chansey is more than happy to get parlayed from Body Slam, and can retaliate with a super-effective Thunderbolt. Snorlax is a fine switch in, taking little from its moves and attacking back with Body Slam, and at the very least it will be able to Self Destruct on Lapras for massive damage. Zapdos out speeds and can KO with Thunderbolt, although it will be hard to bring in. Cloyster can come on everything in bar Thunderbolt. Gengar is immune to Body Slam, and can attack with super-effective Thunderbolt. Alakazam and Starmie can beat it out if they don't get unlucky with para-fusion and all, and can outspeed to finish, as can Tauros and Persian.

    Cloyster

    -Blizzard
    -Explosion
    -Hyper Beam
    -Double Edge / Rest

    Cloyster looks amazing on paper, with its titanic Defense stat, but in practice, its pretty mediocre. Like a lot of other RBY walls, Cloyster to faces large problems with critical hits, it doesn't help either that Cloyster has not good form of recovery. By far though, Cloyster's biggest problem is its lack of a real purpose on teams, while it does get STAB Blizzard, Cloyster has problems actually using it effectively to do anything, if one switches in an Ice resist, its only option is to Explode, and that's all it can do. Still, Cloyster remains the best physical wall, a bit a flawed one, that at the very least can do some good damage with Blizzard and then Explode.

    Blizzard is Cloyster's go to move, doing solid STAB damage and at the same time, rolling the dice for a Freeze. Explosion is Cloyster's main move it commonly uses to get rid of opposing threats, which otherwise can take a Blizzard. Hyper Beam is a secondary physical attack, to finish off weakened Pokemon, weak on their physical side, without using Explosion. The last slot is a complete toss up, Double Edge works in the same vien as Hyper Beam, but without risking a recharging if you fail to KO, finally Rest allows Cloyster to attempt to heal and be a real wall, however, often it it better to just Explode on threats.

    Checks and Counters

    Gengar is one of the better Cloyster counters, as Cloyster can only Blizzard it, and Gengar can retaliate with a super-effective Thunderbolt. Explosion though, for most Pokemon, makes Cloyster a pain to deal with, it is often better to bait Cloyster into using Explosion, and then switch to a Normal resist. At the very least though, Cloyster Explodes, and both sides lose a Pokemon, so its not to much of a problem. Starmie and Chansey are adequet Pokemon for the job, both of which take Blizzard fine, bar a Freeze, and can attack back with Thunderbolt. Alakazam can check a weakened Cloyster with Psychic on its weak Special side. Snorlax does a fair job at weakening Cloyster down with Body Slam, and at the very least can Explode on it. Thunderbolt Lapras can take even Explosion, and attack with Thunderbolt. Finally, Zapdos out speeds, and can 1HKO with STAB super-effective Thunderbolt.

    Uncommon Pokemon:

    Venusaur

    -Sleep Powder
    -Swords Dance
    -Body Slam
    -Razor Leaf

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Hyper Beam
    -Leech Seed
    -Toxic

    Venusaur on paper looks like a monster, solid all around base stats, the ability to Sleep and boost, all while having the coveted 100% Critical Hit Razor Leaf. So why isn't Venusaur taking the metagame by storm? First off, Vensaur has some serious middling speed issues, being out-sped by a ton of offensive threats, with weaknesses to the common Psychic types and the spammed Blizzard. Finally, Venusaur is often hard walled by common Pokemon such as Gengar, Exeggutor, Zapdos which severely hamper it's sweep. Still, Venusaur has all the tools it needs to pull off a sweep, and if given the opportunity, it will.

    The move set makes the best use of Venusaur's abilities, Sleep Power to cripple something, which Swords Dance instantly turns Vensuar into a threat, it will often has ample time to use it as people switch in and out their sleep fodder. Body Slam is the main attacking option, boosted by Swords Dance with the nice paralysis chance. Finally Razor leaf finished off the coverage, hitting Golem and Rhydon, while also being a solid STAB move.

    Checks and Counters

    Venusaur, like other sleepers can be a bit tricky to counter, once something is put to sweep, it is much easier to deal with. Gengar is a hard counter, putting it to Sleep with Hypnosis, although it will have trouble getting it down to low health with Thunderbolt, as the least though it can Explode. Exeguttor and Zapdos also work fine, taking even boosted Body Slams like a champ and threatening to KO with Psychic or Drill Peck. Alakazam is a solid check, outright 1HKOing Venusaur, it will not enjoy stomaching a Body Slam or Sleep Powder though. Starmie and Tauros also stand a fair shot at checking it, hitting hard with Blizzard and Body Slam, or in Starmie's case, crippling with Thunder Wave. Finally, Lapras can take one Razor Leaf, and 1HKO with Blizzard.

    Charizard

    -Fire Blast
    -Swords Dance
    -Body Slam / Hyper Beam
    -Earthquake

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Fly

    Charizard gets a bad rap for being the proto-typical noob Pokemon, especially in later generations. In early generations though, Charizard is alright, not the best but its still a good option, sadly though its still a Pokemon used a ton by noobs. In RBY, Charizard is a solid Swords Dance sweeper which can get opportunities to get up against common Pokemon like Exeggutor, threatening with STAB Fire Blast. However, it suffers a bit of Fire-type syndrome, as it melts your Freezes, which in part of what makes it so unattractive for serious battlers, also its a tab bit slot for sweeping standards.

    Fire Blast is Charizard's primary STAB attack, hitting everything hard with a solid burn chance, much like a gen 1 version of Scald, be careful not to unfreeze your opponent though. Swords Dance allows Charizard to sweep with either Body Slam or Hyper Beam in the end game. Earthquake is Charizard's coverage move against Pokemon which usually wall it, like Golem and Rhydon, although be warned, even a boosted Earthquake will fail to KO either of them.

    Checks and Counters

    As mentioned, Golem and Rhydon are among the best counters, even taking boosted Earthquake and threatening to 1HKO with Rock Slide. However, a Charizard spamming Fire Blast has a good shot as burning either of them, which really screw them over. Starmie takes all but Bodyt Slam switching in well, and can hit hard with Blizzard or a Eater-type attack. Lapras can always take a hit and 1HKO with Blizzard, Alakzam and Tauros are solid checks as well.

    Machamp

    -Body Slam
    -Submission
    -Earthquake
    -Hyper Beam

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Low Kick
    -Rock Slide
    -Substitute

    Machamp is arguably the only viable fighting type in OU, and as such garners use again the ever common Rock, Normal, and Ice types. Machamp stands out against his Fighting-type brethren thanks to its solid Attack and defenses, making it a solid tank, Hitmonlee and Primeape are too frail and slow for the RBY metagame. Machamp still suffers the same big problem as them though, that in RBY fighting moves are overall terrible, with low base power, not to mention in RBY Fighting-types are magnets for the ever common Psychic-type Pokemon which can easily check to 1HKO. Machamp is also kind of slow for RBY, being out sped by Pokemon like Lapras and tieing Exeggutor.

    Body Slam is Machamp's main attacking move, as its Fighting-type moves are rather weak unless they are super-effective, hitting hard with its massive attack with a nice paralysis chance. Submission is a STAB requirement, scaring out Chansey and Snorlax, Body Slam is overall a better move to use on switches, so you will more often use it. Earthquake hits Gengar, whom would otherwise wall Machamp, and finally Hyper Beam is a nice finisher move to possibly sweep with in the end game.

    Checks and Counters

    Exeggutor is easily the best counter, taking little from Body Slam and retaliating with Psychic. Slowbro takes every move with ease, and can take the opportunity to Amnesia for a sweep. Zapdos also works well, hitting hard with Drill Peck, it does not enjoy being paralyzed though, some Machamps also run Rock Slide. Starmie, Alakazam, and Jynx can both check, Alakazam outright 1HKOing, although none wants to take Body Slam or be paralyzed. Since Machamp rarely uses Earthquake before they see Gengar, its a relatively safe switch in which can put to sleep, chip with Thunderbolt, or just Explode. Golem, Rhydon, and Lapras can take a super-effective hit can hit hard in return to check, Persian and Tauros can also check a weakened Machamp.

    Jolteon

    -Thunderbolt
    -Thunder Wave
    -Double Kick
    -Pin Missile

    Uncommon Moves:
    -Substitute
    -Sand Attack

    Jolteon is an interesting option over Zapdos, being stronger, faster, and with even arguably a better movepool. Jolteon's problem though is it's terrible frailty, on par with Pokemon like Alakazam in ability to take physical hits, Zapdos on the other hand has excellent mixed bulk, allowing it to be an excellent glue for teams. Still, being almost the fastest Pokemon in the game has it's benefits to check everything along with a solid Critical Hit rate. Zapdos is still a solid special attacker, if it's usual counters are out of the picture, it is almost as fearsome a sweeper as Tauros its self.

    Thunderbolt is the man STAB attacking option of course hitting everything not with a resistance / immunity or Chansey hard. Thunder Wave cripples in coming Pokemon such as Alakazam, which may otherwise come in without fear, as well as generally crippling Pokemon for an endgame sweep for something else. Double Kick and Pin Missile come off of Joltoeon's pathetic attack, however they have their niche uses. Double Kick does a little chip damage on Golem and Rhydon switch in, while doing a decent chunk to Chansey, possibly 2HKOing with 2 Critical Hits. Pin Missile hits Exeggutor which otherwise walls it hard, potentially 2HKOing it.

    Checks and Counters

    Jolteon suffers from many of the same counters as Zapdos, mainly Golem and Rhydon wall it hard, at best doing 30% with a Critical Hit from Double Kick. Chansey makes a fair counter for Jolteon, crippling it with Thunder Wave and wearing it down with Ice Beam, be sure to stay at high health though, as Critical Hit Double Kick hurts. Snorlax is sure to 2HKO with Body Slam or even 1HKO with Hyper Beam, however, Thunderbolt does a decent chunk to Snorlax. Alakzam can take a Thunderbolt and retaliate with Psychic, it will not like being crippled by Thunder Wave though. Tauros and Jynx can both take a Thunderbolt and hit hard in return, Gengar can spring for Hypnosis or just Explode.

    Articuno

    -Blizzard
    -Hyper Beam
    -Double Edge / Ice Beam
    -Agility / Ice Beam

    Uncommon moves:
    -Rest
    -Reflect

    Articuno looks like it has everything going for it in RBY, a solid special, defenses, and an accurate Blizzard which has the potential to forever freeze. So why it isn't it more common? Because... that's is, that is literally all it can do, spam Ice attacks. Anything which can stomach a Blizzard move pretty much hard walls it, and the rest of it's move pool it rather empty with little other options. Finally it's speed is rather mediocre for RBY attacking standards, leaving it out sped by common threats. Articuno is still a powerful Pokemon and freezing platform though, so don't underestimate it.

    Blizzard is Articuno's main attack, rarely deviating from it, as its its strongest STAB move at 120 damage which can also freeze. After that though, the movepool is pretty much filler. Hyper Beam is a solid physical move which can damage and maybe finish a weakened Chansey, Starmie, or Alakazam. Agility gives Articuno a chance to boost it's speed to be a bit more dangerous to threats such as Tauros and Persian. Double Edge is another physical attack move as an option to not risk recharging with Hyper Beam. Ice Beam and be tossed in if Articuno wants to not risk a Blizzard miss or PP loss in killing off weakened things.

    Articuno can also run a stalling set with Rest and Reflect to spam ice attacks for Freezes... its bad though, don't use it, feel free to try out Reflect though as filler.

    Checks and Counters

    Cloyster and Lapras are hard counters, quadruply resisting Blizzard, immune to Freezing, and taking little from its physical moves. Slowbro takes all moves with ease and proceeds to set up Amnesia. Starmie is a good counter, hitting it hard with a super effective Thunderbolt or crippling with Thunder Wave, even restoring health with Recover. Chansey and Alakazam are solid counters, running in the same vein as Starmie, although they are a bit more susceptible to Articuno's physical moves. Snorlax and Gengar can stomach Blizzards and retaliate with Body Slam or Thunderbolt, they are not idea counters though. Zapdos out speeds and can 1HKO with Thunderbolt to revenge, it can't switch in at all though, being 1HKOed by Blizzard.

    Moltres

    -Fire Blast
    -Hyper Beam
    -Double Edge
    -Agility / Reflect / Substitute

    Moltres suffers the same problem as Articuno in RBY, it can't do much outside of its singular STAB move. In Moltres's case, the problem is further pushed as it's main attack is a Fire-type, making it un-freeze opposing Pokemon, common counters such as Chansey also enjoy the Fire Blast burns. Still, a STAB Fire Blast common off Moltres is nothing to scoff at, coming from 125 attack, its defenses and speed aren't to stabby either, all that is hard to overcome its lack of a movepool and Fire-typing still.

    Fire Blast is a requirement, being its main and pretty much only STAB move, Flamethrower is actually illegal. Hyper Beam allows it to clean off weakened Pokemon which can take a Fire Blast, such as Starmie, Chansey, and Alakazam, hitting them all on their weaker physical side. Double Edge is another physical move which aims for the same Pokemon as Hyper Beam, but without the chance of recharging. The last slot is entirely filler, Agility can be used in an attempt to boost its speed for a possible late game sweep, Reflect makes Moltres a solid tank, thanks to its already solid defenses, and finally Substitute can be used if one predicts the switch for the opponent.

    Checks and Counters

    Slowbro is the best counter, taking every hit fine and setting up Amnesia. Chansey and Starmie can switch in without a problem, even enjoying the burns from Fire Blast, Alakzam can also be used, although it will not enjoy taking a Hyper Beam or Double Edge. Snorlax, Golem, and Rhydon are all ok checks, taking all moves rather well, it hate being burned though, effectively crippling them, Amnesia Snorlax fairs better though. Zapdos outspeeds and 1HKOs with Thunderbolt, it will not like being burned though, crippling its Drill Peck. Lapras take a big chunk from Fire Blast, but can 1HKO with Blizzard in return. Jynx can outspeed and with hard with STAB super-effective Blizzard.

    Gyarados

    -Blizzard
    -Thunderbolt
    -Body Slam / Surf
    -Hyper Beam / Surf

    Gyarados is an underrated Pokemon in RBY, it is easily one more the best mixed attackers thanks to its great stats and movepool, achieving the infamous Bolt-beam combo with plenty of great move slots to spare. So why is it so criminally underused? Gyarados has a few problems, first off it it's lack of overall power, while Blizzard might be powerful, its only as poweful as Starmie's Blizzard. It has no useful STAB moves outside of Surf, and nothing but general attacks on its strongest physical side. What really hurts Gyarados the most is it's quadrupedal Electric-type weakness, Thunderbolt is rather common in RBY, even Persain has it some time to time. Still, Gyarados is a solid mixed attack, give it a try some time.

    Blizzard is mandatory, being a strong special move with excellent coverage coverage, combined with Thunderbolt, Gyarados has perfect coverage. Thunderbolt is also useful to hit Starmie and other bothersome water types which like to come in to Thunderbolt Gyarados. Body Slam and Hyper Beam are excellent moves which take advantage of Gyarados huge Attack, with the bonus or paralyzing foes or finishing them off. Surf is a good STAB option though to consider, hitting harder than Blizzard or Thunderbolt, and scoring key KOs on Pokemon like Golem and Rhydon.

    Checks and Counters

    Gengar is a hard counter, being immune to its physical moves and taking only a little chip damage from Blizzard thanks to its huge special, in return it 1HKOs with Thunderbolt. Starmie and Lapras make fair counters if they have Thunderbolt, although they do not enjoy taking Thunderbolt themselfs, and Starmie doesn't enjoy Body Slam paralysis. Snorlax takes it's hits well enough, hitting hard back with Body Slam. Exeggutor can stomach a Blizzard or two, and put to sleep, hit hard with Psychic, or just Explode. Zaqpdos out speeds to check easily with Thunderbolt. Chansey can take a Body Slam and hit hard with Thunderbolt or cripple with Thunder Wave.

    Dodrio

    -Body Slam
    -Drill Peck
    -Hyper Beam
    -Mimic / Substitute

    Dodrio is no doubt a powerful threat, but its a bit outclassed, Persain and Tauros are faster, more diverse, and the later is more bulky. Dodrio does have a few advantages over them though, mainly it's higher attack and access to a secondary STAB, Drill Peck, which allows it to hurt the very common Exeguttor much harder than Tauros or Persian, it can also hurt Gengar hard. Dodrio though suffers most from its bad movepool, it is completely incapable of touching Golem and Rhydon, which wall it completely, Dodrio's frailty also hurts it. Dodrio can be an ok lead to, having a good match up against Exeggutor and Jynx. and It is an interesting Pokemon to toy with, perhaps being of good use over Persian as a secondary sweeper.

    Body Slam is it's main attack, hitting most of the metagame with solid STAB damage with the nice chance to paralyze. Drill Peck is the lesser used secondary attack, but it has good use to hit Gengar and Exeggutor. Hyper Beam is a good finishing move, and thanks so its solid attack, it has a good shot at outright 1HKOing Pokemon like Alakazam and Jynx. After that, Dodrio runs out of good moves, Mimic is a bit of a gimmicky option to possibly snag an Earthquake from Golem or Rhydon, Substitute can be used if one predicts the switch to scout for a move to use.

    Checks and Counters

    Rhydon and Golem as the best counters, taking little from Body Slam and Drill Peck, only perhaps getting paralyzed. Even if Dodrio manages to mimic an Earthquake, it will not do that much thanks to their huge defense. Cloyset and Lapras can take a few hits and 1HKO with Blizzard. Snorlax is an ok switch in, hitting hard with Body Slam and possibly paralyzing, it can always Self Destruct on it to, be wary though, Dodrio is a bit stronger than Tauros, guaranteed to at least 3HKO, possibly 2HKOing with Body Slam + Hyper Beam. Since Body Slam is the primary attack, Gengar can often come in and threaten to Thunderbolt. Starmie, Tauros, Persian, Alakzam, and Zapdos can all check if it has a little prior damage, as it is rather frail.

    Raichu

    -Thunderbolt
    -Surf
    -Thunder Wave
    -Submission / Hyper Beam

    Riachu is usable for pretty much only one reason: Surf. Surf allows Raichu to 1HKO Golem and Rhydon, making it the only Electric-type which can damage them pretty much at all. However, this comes at a bit of a cost, Riachu is pathetically frail, on the same level as Jolteon, to make matters worse it really isn't that fast by RBY standards being outsped by common sweepers like Tauros and Alakazam, and its offenses aren't enough to break through defensive Pokemon like Exeggutor. Still, being able to 1HKO Rhydon and Golem is nothing to take lightly, they are staples of standard OU teams.

    Thunderbolt is still Raichu's primary STAB attack hitting whatever doesn't resist it pretty hard. Surf of course allows Raichu to beat Golem and Rhydon, don't leave home without it, or else you have an inferior Electric-type. Thunder Wave cripples opposing Pokemon, which can be particularly useful as Raichu often doesn't have the outright power to muscle through some threats, it is better to cripple them. The last slot is a bit of a toss up, Submission can hit Chansey pretty hard, although it is useless on little else, Hyper Beam can finish off opposing Pokemon which take less from Thunderbolt, such as Exeggutor.

    Checks and Counters

    Exeggutor is a solid counter, taking little from Hyper Beam even, only fearing being KOed at low health. Chansey is an OK counter, although it will not enjoy taking repeated Hyper Beams and Submissions, one critical hit and Chansey is done for, Snorlax is in a similar vien, although it takes Submission and Hyper Beam much better. Tauros outspeeds and does a huge chunk with Earthquake. Alakazam will do a ton of damage with Psychic, usually 2HKOing it, while Raichu can do little in return outside of Hyper Beam or cripple with Thunder Wave. Gengar takes all hits rather well, although it has little to retaliate outside of Hypnosis and Explosion.

    Rare Pokemon:

    Blastiose and Vaporean
    /
    -Blizzard
    -Surf / Hydro Pump (only Vaporeon)
    -Body Slam
    -Mimic / Rest

    Electrode

    -Explosion
    -Thunderbolt
    -Thunder Wave
    -Screech

    Dugtrio

    -Earthquake
    -Slash
    -Hyper Beam
    -Rock Slide / Substitute /

    Hypno

    -Hypnosis
    -Psychic
    -Thunder Wave
    -Rest

    Victrebel

    -Sleep Powder
    -Swords Dance
    -Body Slam
    -Razor Leaf

    Nidoking

    -Body Slam
    -Earthquake
    -Blizzard
    -Thunderbolt

    Sandslash

    -Swords Dance
    -Earthquake
    -Hyper Beam
    -Body Slam

    Poliwrath

    -Amnesia
    -Surf
    -Blizzard
    -Submission
    Last edited by Kirby; 07-16-2013 at 06:50 PM.

  2. #2
    bye felicia stiles's Avatar
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    aww pokemon are so pretty nowadays

  3. #3
    princeso Kirby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stiles View Post
    aww pokemon are so pretty nowadays
    I know <3

  4. #4
    princeso Kirby's Avatar
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    I think I am going to cut the threat list off at Uncommon Pokemon, the rare pokemon aren't worth worrying about.

    How does this look so far though? I am going to add more general information, but at the moment I was to finish the threat list.

  5. #5
    *wink* leo33wii's Avatar
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    looks pretty good to me
    Leo 3DS friend Code: 0344 - 9299 - 0936

    ;]

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