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  1. #251
    southpaw horyule's Avatar
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    i never read books like those. i feel like im seriously below the intellectual standard of pds elite.

    jurassic park saurus rex

  2. #252
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Thomas Pynchon - The Crying of Lot 49: 9.5/10

  3. #253
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Just finished Notes From Underground, pretty uncanny to be reading how someone perceived himself in relation to the rest of the world before he had /r9k/ to vent his emotional frustrations with. Section II was very funny though, I'd definitely recommend it if you're looking for something short to read.

    8.7/10
    Well, I open my eyes and I see things. I've seen spirits moving through the walls. I've seen a vortex coming through the wall. I've seen amorphous little balls of light bouncing all around in the front yard through the window. I've seen giant bugs on the floor. I was in a hotel room in Amarillo, Texas, and all I remember is standing on the bed and seeing the whole wall in front of me filled with lights that were [makes popping sound] popping like popcorn out of the wall. Then I'll wake up and I go "Wow, I was standing on my bed and staring at this wall."

  4. #254
    what about .. eyebrows God's Avatar
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    read the double

  5. #255
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Is it better? My Penguin Classics edition has both of them together.

  6. #256
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by God View Post
    also lord if you're on a short story kick read borges immediately
    Jorge Luis Borges: Collected Fictions 9.5/10

    Absolutely incredible. First author I've read since Pynchon that left me unable to do anything but marvel at his mastery. Both of them have reinforced my conviction that my life aspiration should be to become a 'mathematician of prose' if it's even possible. They're certainly the two who come closest in my eyes.

    What are your favourite Borges short stories, God? The Library of Babel and Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote are brilliant. The latter was hilarious.

  7. #257
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hicky View Post
    - Most people don't have time to read a novel as long as Infinite Jest over and over again.
    - Statements like 'everyone should do x' should be avoided. There's not a deontic quality about it - certain people should perhaps do certain things, that's about it. Would you recommend Infinite Jest to everyone you know?
    - I got halfway through Infinite Jest, so I am not as qualified as you to judge it. However, I often find that what is expressed in a novel can be very easily expressed in something shorter: a poem, perhaps, or a play. Maybe what is expressed in Infinite Jest is simply inexpressible in all other literary forms, but that's unlikely.
    - I love you Lord.
    Saying someone doesn't have time to read novels as long as Infinite Jest once or repeatedly is a failure on that person's part and not the book or the author, thus it's not a valid excuse for disregarding the existence of said novel, and a contention against being able to say you didn't get it or it wasn't worth your time.

    Statements like 'everyone should do x' shouldn't be avoided when they're true. Infinite Jest is the most acclaimed novel of the 1990s, probably the best novel of the post-industrial age, and more than likely the great American novel of the twentieth century. I've recommended it to more people than I can count and lent my copy out to two different friends. DFW has a way of writing like the voice inside your head actually sounds, his degree perspicacity of perspicacity for life rivals that of James Joyce, his writing is at the same time hilarious, poignant, sad, serious. In 1996 he was writing about subjects no one else was addressing. He's certainly the best observer of the phenomenon of substance addiction I've ever read, and I believe everyone could put Infinite Jest down having read it being slightly more aware on that topic.

    Congratulations on the missing the main point of Infinite Jest. Its trademark maximalism, footnotes, fragmentary story lines, somewhat intimidating length... all of this was a postmodern stunts of sorts, a meta-attempt to convey through literature what it's like living in the advent of the informative age. If its expressive nature was too much for you to handle, it pretty much proved its point. (What's more is the fact that all of these cheap postmodern techniques are actually pulled off in dazzlingly successful ways, individually all of them are still just as brilliant as the sum of their parts.)

    I appreciate your existence too, Hicky. I hope this delayed refutation/rebuttal might change your mind and convince you to give it another go. I don't think you'll regret it.

  8. #258
    Vanity of vanities, all is vanity Hicky's Avatar
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    Jorge Luis Borges: Collected Fictions 9.5/10

    Absolutely incredible. First author I've read since Pynchon that left me unable to do anything but marvel at his mastery. Both of them have reinforced my conviction that my life aspiration should be to become a 'mathematician of prose' if it's even possible. They're certainly the two who come closest in my eyes.

    What are your favourite Borges short stories, God? The Library of Babel and Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote are brilliant. The latter was hilarious.
    I LOVE Borges. He's also a fantastic poet, and he wrote an utterly amazing free verse poem in English in a collection called "The English Poems". I HIGHLY recommend it, it has stayed in my consciousness ever since I read it. One of the lines is something like, "What do I have to offer you except lean streets", a wonderful love poem from a man who's only quality is that he stays up all night, fixated. This is the first literary opinion you've expressed that I've agreed with.

    Also, I love all the short stories that you mentioned.

    As for Pynchon, DFW, etc., we're going to have to agree to disagree. I guess it boils down to a matter of preference (as it has to) - they're just not my kind of authors.

    Congratulations on the missing the main point of Infinite Jest. Its trademark maximalism, footnotes, fragmentary story lines, somewhat intimidating length... all of this was a postmodern stunts of sorts, a meta-attempt to convey through literature what it's like living in the advent of the informative age. If its expressive nature was too much for you to handle, it pretty much proved its point. (What's more is the fact that all of these cheap postmodern techniques are actually pulled off in dazzlingly successful ways, individually all of them are still just as brilliant as the sum of their parts.
    I just simply do not like this aesthetic, and I do not like being bewildered by maximalism. I like a lot of complexity and hard shit. I love Metaphysical poetry, I love Dante's Divine Comedy, I love Ulysses and a lot of modernism (a contemporary British author called Will Self emulates the traditional modernist style). I just do not like the aesthetic you're describing - I've tried to interact with it, and it doesn't appeal to me in any way. This does not mean that I am "missing the point". I GET the point. I just don't like the way the point is delivered.

  9. #259
    Vanity of vanities, all is vanity Hicky's Avatar
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    I guess I'm avoiding your post a little bit with my arrogance. You have encouraged me to re-visit Infinite Jest, a little.

  10. #260
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Hicky, I'll reply to your post someday.
    Well, I open my eyes and I see things. I've seen spirits moving through the walls. I've seen a vortex coming through the wall. I've seen amorphous little balls of light bouncing all around in the front yard through the window. I've seen giant bugs on the floor. I was in a hotel room in Amarillo, Texas, and all I remember is standing on the bed and seeing the whole wall in front of me filled with lights that were [makes popping sound] popping like popcorn out of the wall. Then I'll wake up and I go "Wow, I was standing on my bed and staring at this wall."

  11. #261
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Thomas Pynchon: Mason & Dixon - 11/10. Probably THE great American novel. Read this book.
    Well, I open my eyes and I see things. I've seen spirits moving through the walls. I've seen a vortex coming through the wall. I've seen amorphous little balls of light bouncing all around in the front yard through the window. I've seen giant bugs on the floor. I was in a hotel room in Amarillo, Texas, and all I remember is standing on the bed and seeing the whole wall in front of me filled with lights that were [makes popping sound] popping like popcorn out of the wall. Then I'll wake up and I go "Wow, I was standing on my bed and staring at this wall."

  12. #262
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Lately I've been going through a transitory phase (because calling it an existential crisis is getting old considering they come and haunt my psyche in monthly intervals anyway) wherein I've been looking back at everything I've ever accomplished creatively and I've felt utterly sickened by how derivative it all feels, especially the stuff I've made that I know is objectively very good. Lately my philosophical pondering has laid with the topic of happiness as achieved through the balancing of consumption and production, and tonight I'm deleting every song I have and am replacing it with electronic music from all ages, though mostly stuck in the post-dubstep, future-garage era. I don't think it's enough in this world to encounter greatness and spend the rest of your time telling people about it - I feel the only way I can become great in my own artistic right is to expose myself repeatedly to new ways of thinking, new ways to perceive the sights and sounds around us. I don't even know why I'm posting this here, it must be pretty incoherent as far as blog entries go.
    Well, I open my eyes and I see things. I've seen spirits moving through the walls. I've seen a vortex coming through the wall. I've seen amorphous little balls of light bouncing all around in the front yard through the window. I've seen giant bugs on the floor. I was in a hotel room in Amarillo, Texas, and all I remember is standing on the bed and seeing the whole wall in front of me filled with lights that were [makes popping sound] popping like popcorn out of the wall. Then I'll wake up and I go "Wow, I was standing on my bed and staring at this wall."

  13. #263
    princeso Kirby's Avatar
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    One of these days Lord is just gonna poof away in puff of pompous self inspection.

  14. #264
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Impressive venture into the world of alliteration, though its forced nature leaves it lacking an innate authenticity. Overall I'd rate your post a decent 6.5/10. Maybe you should read some poetry to help you improve. I believe in you anyway, champ!

  15. #265
    princeso Kirby's Avatar
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    I hate poetry.

  16. #266
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Reading the entire bibliography of Franz Kafka instead of studying for rapidly approaching midterms.

    A Description of a Struggle - 7.5/10. Way too jagged as far as storylines go but the sections about landscapes changing and senescence were wonderfully poetic.

    The Judgement - 8.5/10. Pretty fucking grim but otherwise enjoyable.

    Meanwhile, I'm stalling on Ulysses, The Double, and various Pynchon works, as well as collections of poetry I dip in and out of. Way too much going on in my life to apply myself to getting through these right now.

  17. #267
    what about .. eyebrows God's Avatar
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    description of a struggle was tedious and boring imo. i like kafka's very short fiction works quite a bit.
    "I'll go," said Chagataev. "But what will I do there? Build socialism?"
    "What else?" said the secretary.

  18. #268
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Franz Kafka - In The Penal Colony: 9.5/10. Just further proof that the short story is the definitive patrician art form.

  19. #269
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    On that note - I don't remember if I've mentioned this before, but ever since New Year's Eve I've been toiling away at a short story on-and-off. It has a lot of material packed into it in a very constrained manner, teaching me the rest of my life is going to be a struggle to reconcile my maximalist tendencies with my more modernist preference for presentation. The whole thing is a satirical play off of Borges' fictional biobliographies and Barthes' Death of the Author, with a classic Lord twist. If I can pull it off, it might just end up being my magnum opus. But I can't remember writing anything as intellectually draining as this. Or attempting anything as intellectually trying as this, except for when I tried to teach myself the concept of entropy.

  20. #270
    what about .. eyebrows God's Avatar
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    in the penal colony is good, i read it in french back when my french was more shaky than it is now so i should reread it in english and probably get more out of it. i've been reading a lot of earlier english literature lately, renaissance-18th century poetry and prose and such.
    "I'll go," said Chagataev. "But what will I do there? Build socialism?"
    "What else?" said the secretary.

  21. #271
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by God View Post
    i've been reading a lot of earlier english literature lately, renaissance-18th century poetry and prose and such.
    Post more about this, I've been putting off getting into romanticism for ages (that's probably not what you were talking about but w/e) and I need to deter from classicism/postmodernism/modernism at some point.

  22. #272
    what about .. eyebrows God's Avatar
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    the romantics are 19th century but they're good too. i have a couple keats poems memorized.
    "I'll go," said Chagataev. "But what will I do there? Build socialism?"
    "What else?" said the secretary.

  23. #273
    what about .. eyebrows God's Avatar
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    and it's funny how sparse french poetry of the 18th century is, i guess everyone was just writing short stories or philosophy.
    "I'll go," said Chagataev. "But what will I do there? Build socialism?"
    "What else?" said the secretary.

  24. #274
    Registered Users Regular Rayne's Avatar
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    entropy is a fairly straightforward concept

  25. #275
    He's grinning in our direction - but not, of course, at us. Lord's Avatar
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    Not this type of entropy Rayne.

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